Trees to look for in January — Dogwood


Dogwood
Photo credit: Tamsin Bent

Where to look

It is mainly found in hedges and on the edges of woodland. It grows best on calcareous (chalky) soils.

Description

Dogwood (Cornus sanguinea) is a native shrub.  In the spring it has clusters of creamy flowers and in the autumn small black berries (sometimes called ‘dogberries’) and bright red leaves. Its insect pollinated flowers are hermaphrodites (made up of both male and female parts). 
 
However, dogwood is best known for its brightly coloured bark in winter. The bark on the new growth stems is red but only on the stems which are in sunlight. Those in the shade are green! Bark’s job is similar to that of our skin. It protects the tree from the weather, making sure that it doesn’t get scorched from the sun or dried out by the wind and keeps animals and fungi away from the sugary sap underneath.
 
It’s thought that its name has nothing to do with dogs but is from the word ‘dag’ which means skewer or spike because it was used by butchers for skewering meat!

Where we've found Dogwood


Dogwood spottings journal (9 seen)

Last seen Location Spotted by Group Notes
7 Apr 2020 Garden Jo The Weaver's
30 Mar 2020 Ceplsmmil and gardn Ella The Weaver's
24 Mar 2020 Treglines, Cornwall. Gavin Blended Spotted in Treglines, Cornwall.
12 Mar 2020 Blended
12 Mar 2020 Blended
11 Jan 2020 Tamsin Bent Stroud Valleys Project
8 Jan 2020 Ilse L Layfield Leafgatherers I saw some more dogwood today
7 Jan 2020 Edie L Layfield Leafgatherers I saw this on my way to school
6 Jan 2020 Buckley-Nolans

← OTHER THINGS TO LOOK FOR THIS MONTH

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